Nettle Pakoras

Nettle Pakoras

Spring is in the air and nettles have overtaken our garden. Instead of feeling annoyed by their presence and wondering how long it will take to ‘get rid’ of them, we decided to find out a bit more about them and welcome them into our meal times ūüôā Ingredients 2 x handful of freshly picked nettle leaves (go for the young one’s nearest the top) 1 x onion thinly sliced 2 x small potatoes thinly sliced Chickpea / gram flour Water Pinch of cumin seeds Pinch of coriander seeds Salt Pepper Paprika powder Vegetable oil / sunflower oil to deep fry Method First put a pan of water to boil. Place nettle leaves in a seive and rinse. (use gloves if needed!) Add them to the pan of boiling water. And boil for 4-5 mins max (this will remove their sting) Drain and rinse in cold water Chop nettle leaves In a bowl add nettle leaves, potatoes and onions. Add salt, pepper and paprika according to taste. Slightly rub the cumin between the palm of you hands then add go bowl. Do the same with the coriander seeds. Sieve in enough gram flour to lightly coat the vegetables. Add water a little at a time to help bind the mix. Heat enough oil in a pan to deep fry the pakoras. Once oil has heated somewhat, drop in a small amount of the batter to test if the oil is actually hot enough. If it is, the mix should sizzle and quite quickly float to the top. Once cooked through (lightly browned) this drop can be used to check...
Spaghetti & Sea Bream Tossed in Wild Garlic Pesto

Spaghetti & Sea Bream Tossed in Wild Garlic Pesto

My 4 year old and I went foraging the other day and were so excited to find wild garlic shoots sprouting out the ground. Love how the garlic brings some heat to this dish. Ingredients  For the pesto Handful of wild garlic Handful of pine nuts Salt to taste Olive oil For the rest 1 x Sea Bream – Whole / 2 x fillets Salt & Pepper to taste Oil for shallow frying fish Organic wholewheat spaghetti Method Make the pesto by adding a pinch of salt to a mortar, followed by the wild garlic and pound. Then add some pine nuts and bash some more add oil and more salt of needed. Mush to form a paste. You could use a blender to do this. Put to one side. Fillet your bream if you have a whole one, season with salt and pepper and place a frying pan on the stove and drizzle with oil In another pan cook the spaghetti according to the instructions on the pack. Once the oil is hot in the frying pan, place the bream fillets skin side down and cook on medium-high heat till cooked through. Put to one side. Drain the spaghetti onced ready but save some of the cooking water. Add some of the cooking water to the pesto to make it a looser consistency. Place the spaghetti in a large pan / bowl and spoon the pesto over the spaghetti. Toss / fold over the spaghetti to ensure it’s coated in the pesto. Flake the cooked sea bream and add to the spaghetti and gently toss again. Drizzle over...
Red Lentil Daal

Red Lentil Daal

Red Lentil Daal Ingredients 1 onion finely chopped 2 fresh tomatoes chopped Spices (ground cumin, ground coriander, turmeric, paprika, chilli powder) Salt to taste Red lentils Freshly boiled water Fresh Coriander chopped Freshly squeezed juice of a lemon Ground garam masala For The Temper 2 garlic gloves finely grated a little vegetable / light olive oil Chopped green chillies (optional) Method 1. Fry the onions in a little oil until soft and lightly golden 2. Add salt and spices – except garam masala 3. Add chopped tomatoes, stir, cover and leave to simmer for 5 minutes 4. Add Water and stir 5. Add red lentils, stir and bring to the boil 6. Lower heat and simmer until lentils are cooked through and mushy (usually between 30-45 mins). Check to ensure there is enough water in the mix. Add more water for your own preferred consistency if required 7. If the daal is too watery take the cover off and turn up the heat to allow it to thicken and some of the water to evaporate. Adjust salt if needed 8. In a seperate pan, heat a little oil and fry the garlic until very lightly brown (you can add green chillies to this oil too if you would like more of a kick to your daal). Once done add to the lentils. 9. add lemon juice, coriander and a sprinkling of garam masala. Serve. We have it with boiled brown basmati rice and a big salad on the side. Yum. How do you make yours? If you have a go at the above do let us know how it...
Organic Raw Milk – Beechenhill Farm

Organic Raw Milk – Beechenhill Farm

We’re excited to announce that we are now providing a Collection service¬†for Raw Milk direct from Beechenhill Organic Farm. ¬†Our contacts at The Wayfarer Institute pick up¬†the milk on your behalf and¬†bring it back to Birmingham ready for collection on specific Pick Up Days. Beechenhill Farm have¬†a producer retailer license1 that allows them to sell their milk from the farm.¬† Because of this the milk goes through extra tests and has certain control requirements set by the Foods Standards Agency. Food Standards Agency, Current controls: England and Wales 2 “1. The current controls on the sale of raw cows’ drinking milk in hygiene and food labelling regulations are: a) the milk may only be sold direct to consumers by registered milk production holdings (at the farm gate or in a farmhouse catering operation) or through milk roundsmen. Sales through other outlets have been banned since 1985 (although sales by the farmer at farmers markets are allowed); b) the supplying animals must be from a herd that is officially tuberculosis free, and either brucellosis free or officially brucellosis free; c) the production holding, milking premises and dairy, must comply with hygiene rules; d) the milk must bear the appropriate health warning; e) compliance with a) to d) above is monitored by inspections twice a year; and f) the milk is sampled and tested quarterly under the control of the Agency to monitor compliance with standards for total bacterial count and coliforms. 2. The sale of raw drinking milk from sheep, goats or buffaloes: a) is not subject to the restriction at 1a) above; b) raw drinking milk from buffaloes has...
Natural & Halal Farming – The Willowbrook Way

Natural & Halal Farming – The Willowbrook Way

Our meat is sourced from Willowbrook Farm in Oxford. To help you¬†get a little bit of insight as to how the Willowbrook family farm we thought we’d share some of their beliefs and principles which shape the way they work. The following text is also present on¬†their website and can be viewed here:¬†http://www.willowbrookorganic.org/node/25   Our principles As a Muslim family we derive our principles for farming from the concepts of halal/halaal and¬†tayib/tayyib (purity and wholesomeness). This means we adopt a holistic approach to all aspects of food production, from the soil to the consumer. We keep our flock of sheep at a naturally sustainable and manageable stocking level, meaning they have plenty of access to their fresh grass and hay.¬†Even in our non-organic produce, we still strive to meet the highest standards: using no chemicals, or hormones on our livestock or on our pasture. Unlike many farmers rearing large numbers of comercial fast growing birds we choose to rear¬†traditional natural breeds¬†of chicken in small mobile poultry units again with permanent access to their pasture. Our principles are informed by the desire to farm naturally, organically and sustainably: To treat livestock ethically, meeting their physiological and behavioural needs To maintain the long term fertility and biological activity of soils To foster biodiversity and protect sensitive habitats and landscape features To maximise use of renewable sources and recycling To minimise pollution and waste To develop ecologically responsible production, processing and distribution chains, emphasising local¬†systems What is Halal? Halal¬†literally means ‘acceptable’ or ‘sanctified’. But the concept of halal food goes further than the literal meaning and is used in the Quran in...